Using Technology in Teaching

William Clyde and Andrew Delohery

View Inside Price: $35.00


May 11, 2005
256 pages, 7 x 10
193 b/w illus.+ includes CD-ROM
ISBN: 9780300103946
Paper

Computers can help teachers accomplish many of their tasks more efficiently and effectively, but how can a time-strapped teacher determine which pieces of technology are likely to be most helpful? This easy-to-read book offers useful guidance for real-world situations. Organized around specific instructional goals (improving student writing, promoting collaborative learning) and commonly encountered tasks (communicating with students between class, distributing course materials), the book shows teachers at all instructional levels when and how technology can help them meet everyday challenges.
Written in an anecdotal, non-technical style, the book and its accompanying CD-ROM cover how to use technology to:

communicate with students

distribute course materials

promote collaborative learning

learn through experience

clarify course objectives

improve student writing

develop student research skills

use assessment and feedback

collect course materials

identify plagiarism

and more
Teachers looking for tools to help them work better and more quickly will welcome this invaluable guide to the technology that will expedite their search.

William Clyde teaches finance and is dean of academic technology, and Andrew Delohery teaches English composition and is director of The Learning Center, both at Quinnipiac University.

"I know of no other book that approaches this subject this way. The idea of having a reference work that is organized by routine instructional needs and cross-referenced with technological interventions is unique.”—Ed Klonoski, Connecticut Distance Learning Consortium

"This is a practical manual that can give traditional instructors in all disciplines 43 specific ways to perform course tasks more effectively with the technology that is currently available. The directions are clear and sequential."—Frank Christ, professor emeritus at California State University, Long Beach, and visiting scholar at the University of Arizona

"Using Technology in Teaching is a book written for the 75-80 percent of faculty who are not technology savants but are aware of the need to integrate technology effectively and efficiently into their courses. The book is valuable for helping faculty, be they new to the profession or experienced veterans, as they consider how technology can streamline instruction, engage an increasingly technologically savvy student population, and increase the quality of instruction with deeper learning principles. Additionally, the companion CD-ROM brings to life many of the illustrations in the book, providing step-by-step, real-time visualizations."—Patricia McGee, Educause Quarterly

"Provides teachers with guidance for technology in real-world situations."—Learning & Leading With Technology

"Do you know what a threaded discussion is?  A web posting, or asynchronous chat?  Chances are, of course, that you've got a pretty good idea, even if like most of us nowadays you might experience some difficulty explaining it clearly to someone you're trying to help.  If it's for a colleague grappling with issues in using technology to best help their students learn then this book is a must addition to your library. . . . [Clyde and Delohery] have written a book not for the technology innovators or the skeptics, but rather the 75-80 per cent in the middle, mainstream teachers using some technology, who don't have time to explore the variety of technologies readily available, or contemplate how they might help them meet daily challenges."—Synergy

"Computers can help teachers accomplish many of their tasks more efficiently and effectively, but how can a time-strapped teacher determine which pieces of technology are likely to be most helpful? This easy-to-read book offers useful guidance for real-world situations. Organized around specific instructional goals (improving student writing, promoting collaborative learning) and commonly encountered tasks (communicating with students between class, distributing course materials), the book shows teachers at all instructional levels when and how technology can help them meet everyday challenges."—Infobits (From the "Recommended Reading" list of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Academic & Technology Networks' Center for Instructional Technology)


Selected for Association of American University Presses (AAUP) Books for Public and Secondary School Libraries, 2006